Tim Shieff | Viva!

Tim Shieff

Tim Shieff, world class free runner

Timothy "Lifewire" Shieff is a professional Freerunner and went vegan in 2012. He has competed in championships, won awards and participated on MTV's Ultimate Parkour Challenge and the televised American and UK Ninja Warrior competitions. He's famous for scaling buildings, doing one-armed handstands and walking with his hands!

“Choosing to take a life, against the free will of that being, is unethical. It is not about survival anymore. There is no argument against that so I try to be logical and point that out to people.

“It’s all part of a spiritual (not religious) journey for me. Veganism isn’t the sole message, mindfulness is, but veganism is the biggest chapter right now for the spiritual awakening that is going on. People want world peace and yet harm animals, and yet it is all interlinked. When our society wilfully allows animals to be treated badly; animals that we feel empathy with; then it isn’t a far step to treating humans the same way. When society is civil to animals, we will also be civil to each other. To me ending speciesism is the root to world peace and the third step in the trilogy of black rights, women’s rights and animal rights; when we address that it will lead to a whole new world.

"Parkour is about good strength to body weight ratio and going vegan way improved it. I was a lot more bulky before whereas now I’m leaner, more agile and explosive and even my recovery time is shorter.

“Of course there’s a lot of movement and load on my joints and in the winter they would ache a lot more and it took me longer to warm up, whereas now I feel looser and more connected throughout my body.” (Quote from an interview with Juliet Gellatley for Viva!Life issue 60)

 

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/jun/16/go-veggie-to-save-the...

Tim Shieff
"Injustices can’t go on forever, and we’re in the midst of a massive shift. 20% of 16- to 25-year-olds are now vegetarian or vegan [in the UK], compared with 12% of the country. This generation really gets it. And they’re only going to grow older, and new generations will be more sensitive and more proactive. Kids understand why they shouldn’t eat animals. So as they grow up, in the next 20 to 30 years, I think we’ll get kids saying, “Mummy, Daddy, I can’t believe you used to eat animals.""