Post-Weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS) and Porcine Dermatitis and Nephropathy Syndrome (PDNS) | Viva! - The Vegan Charity

Post-Weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS) and Porcine Dermatitis and Nephropathy Syndrome (PDNS)

Post-Weaning Multisystemic Wasting Syndrome (PMWS) has become of significant and considerable concern in many parts of the world, particularly Canada, the United States and Europe. It tends to be a slow and progressive disease with a high fatality rate in affected pigs. The main symptoms of PMWS are weight loss and laboured breathing in weaner pigs, usually around six to eight weeks old. The pigs may also suffer scours, anaemia and jaundice. Weaned pigs lose weight and gradually become emaciated. Their hair becomes rough, and their skins pale and sometimes jaundiced. Death is sudden.

Porcine Dermatitis and Nephropathy Syndrome (PDNS), on the other hand, occurs mainly in ‘growers’ and ‘finishing’ pigs. PDNS is characterised clinically by acute onset of skin lesions (raised purple skin lesions progressing to multifocal raised red scabs with black centres most prominent on the rear legs), fever, depression and lethargy. The majority of pigs that develop extensive skin blotching die (86). Clinical signs may occur within a few pigs in a herd sporadically, and the disease may then go undiagnosed, or they may occur in a bigger proportion of pigs. Filthy pens and feed containers spread the disease, as does crowding and mixing animals from different farms (86).

PDNS is combining with PMWS and killing more pigs than ever before.